Equality Rankings

State of Black America Equality Rankings

In 2014, the National Urban League introduced rankings of unemployment and income equality between whites, Black and Latinos in the nation's largest metropolitan areas. See Black-White rankings and Hispanic-White rankings, and how these communities fare based on major cities.


 

Hispanic-White Unemployment Metro Ranking - 2017

With an index of 114.5%, North Port-Sarasota-Bradenton, FL topped the Hispanic-White Metro Unemployment Equality Rankings this year. North Port moves up from #7 last year. There were a total of four metros in the 2017 Index with a Hispanic-white unemployment index greater than 100—indicating that the Hispanic unemployment rate was lower than the white unemployment rate, compared to only one in last year’s index. The metro area with the largest disparity between Hispanic and white unemployment rate is Rochester, NY (35.7%).

Hispanic-White Income Metro Ranking - 2017

For Latinos, median household incomes were closest to those of whites in Modesto, CA, which was up from #17 in last year’s ranking as a result of 16.9% income growth for Latinos and a 3.9% decline for whites. In Modesto, the median Hispanic household had 88 cents for every dollar of median white household income. Hispanic and white incomes were least equal in Springfield, MA where the gap was 40 cents on the dollar.

Black-White Unemployment Metro Ranking - 2017

With an index of 70.3%, the San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX metro area tops the list as the metro area with the smallest Black-white unemployment gap. The Black unemployment rate in San Antonio was 6.4% (down 1.9 percentage points) and the white rate was 4.5% (down 0.4 percentage points). With an index of 19.6%, this year’s least equal metro area is Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI, reflecting double-digit unemployment for Blacks (13.8%) and an exceptionally low rate for whites (2.7%). Milwaukee was also ranked last in the 2016 rankings.

Black-White Income Metro Ranking - 2017

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA remained at the top of the Black-White Income Equality ranking for the third consecutive year, even as the value of Black median household income relative to whites declined. According to the 2017 Index, the median Black household in Riverside had 72 cents for every dollar of median white household income, down from 76 cents last year. Black and white incomes were least equal in Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI where the gap was 41 cents on the dollar.

Hispanic-White Income Metro Ranking - 2016

For Latinos, median household incomes were closest to those of whites in Urban Honolulu, HI which was up from #7 in last year’s ranking as a result of 3 percent income growth for Latinos and 1.3 percent growth for whites.  In Urban Honolulu, the median Hispanic household had 80 cents for every dollar of median white household income.  Hispanic and white incomes were least equal in Springfield, MA where the gap was 40 cents on the dollar. 

2016 Black-White Income Metro

Unlike the Black-white unemployment equality rankings, the Black-White Income Equality Index rankings were relatively stable between 2015 and 2016.  Six of last year’s top 10 metros were again in the top 10 this year.  In the Hispanic-white rankings, seven of last year’s top 10 appear at the top of this year’s list.  The full list of Black-white and Hispanic-white 2016 Metro Income Equality Index rankings, complete with a comparison to 2015, can be found in additional tables on www.stateofblackamerica.org.

Hispanic-White Unemployment Metro - 2016

With an index of 103.6 percent, Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, IN topped the Hispanic-white metro unemployment rankings this year.  Indianapolis was #2 last year behind Deltona-Daytona Beach-Ormond Beach, FL, which fell to #49 this year.  While there were a total of five metros in the 2015 Index with a Hispanic-white unemployment index greater than 100 -- indicating that the Hispanic unemployment rate was lower than the white unemployment – Indianapolis was the only metro with that distinction in this year’s index. 

Hispanic-White Unemployment Metro Ranking - 2016

Hispanic-White Unemployment

The 2016 Equality Index of Hispanic America stands at 77.8 percent compared to a revised 2015 index of 77.3 percent.  The increase in the Hispanic-White Index resulted from a major improvement in the social justice index (from 66.6% to 75.9%) and smaller gain in the economics index (from 60.8% to 61.8%) that helped to offset losses in all other categories.  The greatest losses were in civic engagement (from 71.0% to 67.6%), followed by health (from 106.8% to 105.5%), and education (from 74.6% to 74.2%). 

Black-White Unemployment Metro Ranking - 2016

As President Obama wraps up the final months of his second term as the nation’s first African-American president, many will begin to assess the progress the nation has made under his administration, and more specifically, the progress that Black America has made.  In making these critical assessments, we must also consider which presidential candidate is best suited to meet the challenges and seize the opportunities that lie ahead for the United States.  How well has the nation recovered from the worst economic crisis it has seen in generations?  How much closer to the goal of universal hea

Black-White Unemployment Metro - 2015

Last year, the National Urban League introduced rankings of unemployment and income equality between whites, Blacks and Latinos in the nation’s largest metropolitan areas. Comparison of the 2014 and 2015 Metro Unemployment Equality Index rankings reveals that there was quite a bit of shuffling of metros at the top of the list1. In the Black–White rankings, only three of the cities in last year’s top 10 were also in this year’s top 10. In the Hispanic–White rankings, only four of last year’s top 10 metros remained at the top of this year’s list.

Pages